Menu
 back

IMSP Blog

Embracing the Multi-Age Group

It is no surprise to hear parents expressing doubts about a multi-age classroom, and questioning how children of different ages could work together harmoniously in the same environment, and if there are any benefits to this approach. 

Read more

Mindful Walks and Experiential Learning in Elementary

Maria Montessori used to walk through the forests in India pulling leaves from trees to teach about their function and structure, digging in the soil to demonstrate the ubiquitousness of life, examining root systems and connecting them to academic ideas.

Read more

How to Help your Toddler Get Dressed

Patience and a positive attitude are key when helping children with dressing and undressing. This means staying engaged with your child, maintaining eye contact, but also being patient as they process the information and movements. 

Read more

Freedom and the Montessori Classroom

“To give a child liberty is not to abandon him to himself."

Read more

Toilet Training: A Key How to Succeed

How to handle toilet training? It seems to often become a great source of anxiety and frustration for parents, but it doesn’t have to be. In Montessori Infant and Toddler classrooms, we use a time-tested, practical and respectful way to support toileting.

Read more

The Little Panda

If you’re interested in kids activities or events happening in Prague during the coming weekend or through the year, check out the website of our partner - www.littlepanda.cz.

Read more

Get To Know Primary Lead Teacher: Veronika Newkirk

Veronika wanted to be a teacher from her childhood. Despite this she was graduated from Legal Studies at the Charles University. After having her first child, she fell in love with Montessori and her dream job came true. She devoted her career path to being a Primary Montessori teacher.

Read more

Starting Preschool: How to Handle Saying Goodbyes?

Before the age of two, the child undergoes a series of developmental changes making them ready for a new social environment. Although the parents are still the most important people in their world, children now need an expansion of their social horizons: the experience of a peer group, of being socially independent. This is a big and valuable step: learning to function without the parents in a community of friends and teachers.

Read more

Let´s pack for a trip with your Toddler

Summer is the perfect time for trips and outings. A backpack of their very own is a great gift for an older toddler or a pre-schooler:  It builds their independence and confidence as they actively participate in preparing for each trip, and then carry their necessities by themselves.

Read more

What does Grace and Courtesy look like in practice?

The purpose of the Grace and Courtesy curriculum in Montessori is to offer our children the best possible assistance on this path. Explaining and modeling clearly, we share the most harmonious ways of behaving, relating and communicating, and help children practice and master them. Step by step, from the simplest skills (like saying “excuse me” or shaking hands) children build a “vocabulary” of actions that allows them to act appropriately and feel confident in social settings. How do we actually practice it in particular age groups?

Read more

Grace and Courtesy: Why is it so important?

Grace and Courtesy is a major part of the Practical Life curriculum from infancy through adolescence. You might overlook the Grace and Courtesy curriculum when you first visit a Montessori classroom; unlike Mathematics or Language, there usually isn’t a dedicated shelf or corner for it. However, it is nonetheless an essential part of the curriculum, with set lessons and goals; its „didactic materials“ are the teachers themselves, as well as the children’s community. Its aim is far more than simply teaching etiquette: it is to aid the self-construction of the child in their task to assume their full place in the human community.

Read more

Cooking With Children can be fun

It is oft said that “the family that eats together, stays together”. We would like to suggest taking it a step further – and encourage every family to cook together, too. In Montessori, we know that kitchen work provides a host of benefits to children, all the way from toddlers to adolescents; it is a part of the Practical Life curriculum as soon as children can walk! However, its advantages are in no way tied to the classroom and can be just as easily – if not more so – applied at home.

Read more
Register for
Toddler & Me
Enroll your child
at IMSP
Workshop:
Raising Boys
without Losing
Your Mind